Is it allowed to go to the sauna when sick?

Going to the sauna while sick is not a good idea. It is better to cure yourself at home in peace. As a preventive measure, the sauna bath may well be beneficial to health.
In the sauna despite illness?

In the sauna despite illness?

Is it allowed to go to the sauna when sick? Sick go to the sauna with a cold – how advisable? The Finns swear by the healing power of the sweat bath. Perhaps well-meaning friends have also advised you to “sweat out” colds. Is there anything to it or should you rather take it easy? Or, to put it another way, is it okay to go to the sauna when you’re sick?

The short answer is No. Basically, you can’t go to the sauna when you are sick. Only go to the sauna if you are healthy. Please do not go to the sauna with a runny nose, cough or even a full-blown bronchitis. You are not doing yourself or the other sauna guests any favors. A cold is highly contagious. In a public sauna facility, numerous people are together in a confined space. In the hot sauna cabin, cold viruses multiply rapidly. But why are sauna sessions not advisable when you have a cold, sore throat, etc.?

The fairy tale of sweating out

Unfortunately, sweating out only works in the rarest of cases. It is true that in the case of fever, the body tries to get the viruses under control by increasing the body temperature. However, this does not work with artificially induced fever by hot sauna air. Sweating in bed at home is the healthier solution. The conventional sauna bath puts too much strain on the already weakened organism. Going into the sauna sickly most likely means coming out even sicker. Rest instead of sweating, is the motto when you are sick.

Attention: If the usual cold symptoms are joined by fever or aching limbs, it could be a real flu. With this disease, you can not go to the sauna in any case!

Sauna bathing for prophylaxis

For prevention, in turn, the sauna bath is excellent. The temperature changes harden us by stimulating blood circulation. It is a good training for our Immune system. However, the effect occurs only after two to three months. To prevent colds, the sauna must be visited at least once a week. Future flu infections will be milder. Studies have proven this effect. Especially as a preparation for the cold season, this method is perfect. The human organism learns to cope better with the cold. Cold germs can then no longer harm us so easily.

Gentler sauna types – steam bath and bio sauna

Many a sauna lover swears by a visit to the steam bath or bio sauna for mild cold symptoms. These sauna types are a gentler alternative to the classic Finnish sauna. Our mucous membranes love the high humidity in the steam bath. The essential oils in the infusions do their part to increase our well-being. On the other hand, the lower heat is not so exhausting for the body. Used correctly, it feels like a soothing, warm bath.

There are three things to keep in mind:

1. take fewer sauna sessions than usual

2. avoid the jump into the ice-cold water or the ice-cold shower.

3. before going home, the body temperature should definitely be back to normal

Despite all this, the whole thing is only something for experienced sauna-goers. An illness is absolutely not a good time for sauna novices to start saunas. And even sauna professionals should not go to the sauna at the first signs of a cold.

Pay attention to the physical signals

If you know your body well, you know what you can and cannot expect of it. In the case of illness, heat is a great burden on the immune system. Do not underestimate this! Always listen to your body’s signals. Give yourself plenty of rest when you have an infection. In most cases, the physical symptoms have subsided about two weeks after the onset of a cold. Then you can prepare for the next wave of colds with sauna baths …

Important Notice: The information in no way replaces professional advice or treatment by trained and recognized doctors. The contents of Saunazeit Magazine cannot and must not be used to independently diagnose or initiate treatment.

 

David Brunner
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